May 2012

PHOBIA AMONG STUDENTS

by Anna Katharina on May 31, 2012

in Journal,Love and Emotions,Nurse Quad

“There would be no one to frighten you if you refused to be afraid.”
-Mohandas K. Gandhi

One of the topics discussed in a nursing psychiatry class is about phobia. A phobia is an anxiety disorder characterized by obsessive, irrational, and intense fear of a specific object, an activity, or a physical situation.

The irrational fear usually results from early painful or unpleasant experiences during childhood involving a particular object or situation especially.

I asked my students to list down their phobia and these were what they mentioned : fear of height (Acrophobia), insects  (Acrophobia) such as coach roach and spider (Arachnophobia) , snake, fear of darkness (Achluophobia) and being alone (Autophobia) , fear of death (Thanatophobia) and dying were the most commonly mentioned phobia. Two students said they fear dogs (Cynophobia) due to a previous  dog bite. A student said he is afraid of clowns (Coulrophobia) because of the color of their faces.

Based on my experience with my patients I have dealt with for the last 15 years, the needle (Aichmophobia, fear of needles) and syringe used for intramuscular injection is a common source of fear. The mere sight of the injection created anxiety especially among male patients. In a private hospital for children where I attended training, nurses were discouraged in wearing an all-white uniform because this gave rise to fear of nurses or doctors among pediatric patients.

      Read this article about fear among children.

My fears? I fear snakes since I was a child, but lately I fear heights and closed spaces (Claustrophobia).  I believe that as one gets older, you become fearful of a lot of things.